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girly-fanatic:

reichenbackdatassup:

wow my brother was telling me this joke and he said

"if you’re fighting with a woman and she pulls a knife on you, just pull out the bread and cheese and meat and her womanly instincts will kick in and she’ll just make you a sandwich"

then all of a sudden our mom emerges from the kitchen holding a huge ass knife and she approaches my brother asking “sorry what was that?” and he started screaming

100000000 points to mom.

Biggest mom win ever!

(Source: spockdarlin)

ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info
ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian."I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."
(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.
Zoom Info

ecumenicalseeker:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.

Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

(Article)

As far as I am concerned this is 100% accurate and I will ALWAYS REBLOG IT.

ouatpetpeeves:

"FACT: Only CS haters call it rape culture, for no other reason than the fact that they just can’t stand it. FACT: This makes them biased and their opinions non-objective. FACT: They are liars."

Umm I think maybe you need a lesson on what facts actually are since those are all pretty subjective statements there.

I’m not really an anything shipper. I just wish this show had lived up to its original potential and hadn’t devolved into petty drama and weird storylines.

Personally I’m not a fan of Hook and think they’ve made him pretty creeptastic at times which is sad considering the potential for character development. But then they’ve done that with a lot of characters on the show. There are some troubling storylines and characters on the show that never really seem to be addressed and it just makes me sad. But I certainly think there’s a lot of misogyny in Hook’s character and I don’t like this supposition that he seems to be rewarded for being a selfish ass most of the time. It’s icky to me. That’s just my five cents.

bronzedragon:

starlightburnbright:

harrypotterconfessions:

I’m sick of people saying Snape was the worst friendzone ever. They weren’t friends anymore. He was hanging around death eaters and was dabbling in dark arts. The friendship wasn’t healthy anymore. 

That doesn’t make it unhealthy… He was being tortured by her boyfriend and his friends and he couldn’t take it anymore so he found people who liked him the way he was. She dumped him as a friend, not the other way around. He called her mudblood, but it was pretty obvious he attempted to apologize and make up for it. SHE DATED A BULLY OVER A GUY WHO JUST WANTED A FRIEND.

First off, “her boyfriend” is inaccurate: when Lily ended her friendship with Snape, she wasn’t dating James. The friendship ended towards the end of their fifth year (“Snape’s Worst Memory” depicts OWLs), while Lily and James didn’t begin dating until their seventh year (canonically, after James had “deflated his head” and begun maturing.)* Lily wasn’t friends with the Marauders at this point. And, as for “he found people who liked him the way he was” - he was already friends with Lily. And…if the “way he was” includes an interest in the Dark Arts and hexing people, then perhaps Snape needed to actually revise who he was instead of finding people who encouraged that? Lily tries to talk to him about this, but he clearly doesn’t listen (see the moment where he turns off as soon as she agrees about disparaging James.) 

Secondly, by their fifth year, the Snape/Lily friendship was toxic and unhealthy. Snape was growing more heavily involved in the Dark Arts and with people who were basically proto-Death Eaters (Rosier, Mulciber, etc.) These are people who are devoted to spewing what is the Wizarding world’s equivalent of racist rhetoric - the people who advocate murder and genocide of Lily and people like her. She dumped him as a friend because he called her Mudblood, but it wasn’t simply because of that - it’s clearly the last straw in a long line of issues Lily has been having with Snape (between Snape condoning what Mulciber did to Mary MacDonald - harmful Dark Magic that Snape dismisses as a prank; Snape calling other Muggle-borns “Mudblood” and using the same rhetoric as his friends; Snape using Dark Magic himself, which Lily abhors.)

Lily’s “I can’t pretend any more” shows that this, and things like this, have been an ongoing issue

I’ve made excuses for you for years. None of my friends can understand why I even talk to you. You and your precious little Death Eater friends – you see, you don’t even deny it! You don’t even deny that’s what you’re all aiming to be! You can’t wait to join You-Know-Who, can you?

Emphasis there on yearsLily has spent years trying to ignore what she knows about Snape, trying to overlook the things he’s said and done, and this - calling her a slur to her face - is a moment of awakening. It’s the point where Lily simply can’t ignore that Snape has become a person who’s no longer her friend - “You’ve chosen your way; I’ve chosen mine.” That James Potter, who she hates, was willing to defend her while Snape called her a slur and said he didn’t need help from someone like her: it’s not a one-off incident, it’s simply the breaking point. 

At that point, apologizing for using the slur isn’t enough, especially when it’s clear that Snape isn’t cognizant of everything else he’s done, or particularly repentant of the other actions he’s done - and his apology isn’t an effort or a promise to change. (Also, Lily doesn’t owe him forgiveness; implying that Lily owes him forgiveness is treading very close to that whole “Lily friendzoned him! Lily was obligated to forgive him! Lily was obligated to fall in love with him!” argument, which is in and of itself complete and utter tripe.) 

*whether and how much James improved will hopefully be expanded upon by Pottermore - on one hand, we know that the bullying continued; OTOH, per Sirius, Lily was explicitly not aware of this - cf. the “he didn’t exactly take Snape along with them on dates and hex him,” comments, among others.) And the “Elvendork! It’s unisex!” story shows someone who’s still immature, and James didn’t have a lot of time in which to mature and grow before his death. But then we also have the James who was loyal to his friends, willing to join the Order and fight and who stood up to Voldemort personally three times; who willingly laid down his life for his wife and infant, wandless, in the hopes of buying them a few moments to escape; who, per JKR and per the text, became a better person. But this isn’t about James and Lily, because at the point where Lily ends the friendship between her and Snape, she clearly still loathes James - she’s calling him an “arrogant bullying little toerag”  at the same time she’s ending the friendship with Snape. This isn’t about Lily choosing James over Snape - it’s about Lily choosing to walk away from Snape. James wasn’t in the picture. 

And Lily had every right to end that friendship. Lily didn’t choose “a bully over a guy who just wanted a friend” - she chose someone who actually respected her over someone who called her the equivalent of a racial slur and who joined an organization devoted to the murder of people like her. Look at their later actions: James loved Lily and gave his life trying to give her a chance to escape. Snape, despite professing love for Lily, would have been willing to let Lily’s child die if it meant that she could be saved. Is that considerate of Lily’s feelings or Lily herself? No - that’s treating Lily like an object - it’s obsession, not love.

(And, actually, at this point in fifth year, Lily doesn’t choose either of them - she chooses to walk away from an unhealthy friendship with Snape, and she chooses to ignore James until she sees that he’s changed. So there’s that. And…to suggest that Lily had to pick Snape or that she should have chosen him…no. Snape didn’t respect her. Snape became a full-fledged Death Eater who believed in the cause after graduation. Snape didn’t care about what Lily wanted - he cared about wanting Lily. (“You do not care, then, about the deaths of her husband and child? They can die, as long as you have what you want?” The answer to that is an obvious, emphatic yes - Snape would have been totally fine with letting Harry die had he been able to secure Lily’s safety. Dumbledore’s “You disgust me” is there for a reason.) 

Also, the entire term “friendzone” is complete and utter bullshit, implying that Lily owed Snape romantic love and sex because he befriended her, but that could be another post entirely. (Nobody owes anyone else romantic love/sex because of friendship, people are not some magic vending machine you put friendship coins into until sex comes out, and Lily’s friendship is not some crappy second-place prize. Lily is not a prize. People are not prizes. That is all.)  

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